Home » Non-cognitive factors that contribute to licensed vocational nurse student success. by Emilee Young
Non-cognitive factors that contribute to licensed vocational nurse student success. Emilee Young

Non-cognitive factors that contribute to licensed vocational nurse student success.

Emilee Young

Published
ISBN : 9780549544425
NOOKstudy eTextbook
123 pages
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 About the Book 

The purpose of this study was to provide a quantitative exploration of Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) students, their interactions and relationships with peers and faculty, and how these interactions and relationships contribute to academic success.MoreThe purpose of this study was to provide a quantitative exploration of Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) students, their interactions and relationships with peers and faculty, and how these interactions and relationships contribute to academic success. Retention and graduation of larger numbers of LVN students can improve the Registered Nurse (RN) shortage. With 1 additional year of preparation, the LVN student is eligible for RN licensure. Increasing the number of LVN graduates means having larger numbers of candidates available for entry into the second year of the RN curriculum.-This study employed a survey instrument to gather information from LVN students at a single school of Licensed Vocational Nursing located in Southern California. Respondents included currently enrolled students, graduates, and students who had withdrawn. The total number of surveys sent out was 626, and the participation rate was 17% or 108 respondents.-Results revealed that student interactions and relationships with peers had a positive effect on student academic success. Having peers to assist with solving problems, to participate in study groups, and demonstrate caring about academic achievement bolstered student success. Peer relationships also enhanced the level of academic and social integration and resulted in less student attrition.-Faculty interactions and relationships with students had a positive effect on student retention and academic success. Students reported that faculty encouragement helped them to persist in school when they were overwhelmed, and that having caring faculty assisted them in doing their best academic work as well as building self-confidence. A majority of the respondents who had withdrawn reported that the reason was largely due to lack of faculty support followed second by family responsibilities.-The major contribution of this study was the development of a better understanding of the influences that peers and faculty may have upon the success of LVN students. The knowledge revealed by these research findings could serve schools of nursing in a helpful way. The knowledge could be used to enhance both student and faculty strategies for reducing attrition rates. By doing so, student retention and matriculation would increase which could provide relief from the national nursing shortage we currently have.